Continue reading "/>
Groopspeak
Latest News
Trump Found Lying On His Presidential Disclosure Form

It might seem pretty obvious that the GOP just simple doesn’t think poor people deserve to have health care, but recently Republican lawmakers have been getting backed into a corner with the morally blind position.

During a Sunday interview on CNN’s State of the Union, host Jake Tapper asked Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) about the current GOP plan to reform health care.  Citing widespread discontent with the plan among GOP governors, Tapper asked:

“They are saying, by removing the Medicaid expansion that happened during Obamacare, that helped provide insurance to 250,000 Arkansans, this replacement is going to take it away.  Does that concern you?”

Apparently it doesn’t concern him much.  Cotton is much more dedicated to the principle of eliminating welfare than helping poor people afford the health care they need:

“Medicaid is a welfare program.  It’s primarily designed for the indigent, elderly, the disabled, the blind and children.”

According to Cotton, there is no room in Medicaid for helping low-income people that simply can’t afford to pay the absurdly high health care premiums along with all other living expenses.

“It’s not designed for able-bodied adults.  We want to get those people off of Medicaid, into a job and into market-based insurance.”

But what about the millions of people who are working full-time, maybe in multiple jobs, yet work for a low-paying sector like service or retail, barely making enough for rent, food and family?  Don’t worry, Senator Tom Cotton cares about them as well:

“I want to assure that the private market is working for them so they can afford insurance and get off Medicaid.”

In the meantime, though, it looks as if he advocates kicking all those hundreds of thousands of people off Medicaid while the market is still way too expensive for them to afford another option.

I’m sure Sen. Cotton will excuse me for thinking it sure looks like he’s more interested in boosting the profits of big health insurance agencies than making sure his constituents are covered.

Watch a clip of the interview below: