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CEO Of Trump’s Disbanded Business Council Just Revealed A Dirty, Embarrassing Secret

Bob Inglis isn’t jumping ship, but he’s definitely telling the captain to start steering in the right direction.

On Twitter, the former congressman from South Carolina is telling his Republican counterparts to correct the record about James Comey’s June 8 testimony, and to get moving on investigation regarding Donald Trump.

Yesterday morning, former FBI director Comey testified before the Senate intelligence panel regarding private conservations he had earlier with Donald Trump in the White House. Responding to a question from the panel, he said Trump was not under investigation on the subject of Russian prostitutes.

That statement was quickly over-generalized throughout social media, however, with Trump supporters claiming Comey stated there’s no FBI investigation of any kind.

And that’s not true, Inglis was quick to point out that afternoon.

Later that night, Inglis tweeted his support for Comey. He also seemed to call for his Republican party to move forward in investigation on that election meddling.

Inglis’ message wasn’t received by House Speaker Paul Ryan, apparently. On June 9, Ryan appeared to downplay the subject, stating that his Republican party wouldn’t pursue any impeachment of a Democratic president in the same circumstances as Trump is in right now.

That’s not correct, Inglis pointed out in a tweet directly to Ryan.

In fact, Inglis says an investigation should be done “with vigor.”

And if investigation results in findings that merit impeachment? “So be it,” Inglis tweeted to Ryan. “Don’t obstruct justice. Put country first.”

Trump tried to pressure Comey to stop FBI investigation of Michael Flynn, Trump’s former national security advisor, Comey alleged. When he refused, Trump fired him, Comey said, and the White House then began a slanderous campaign to discredit Comey, listing other reasons for the firing.

Inglis represented South Carolina’s 4th congressional district in two different six-year terms (1993-1999 and 2005-2011). In 2010’s primary election, he faced multiple Republican opponents, who criticized Inglis for supporting environmental issues and voting against the Iraq war. He lost the Republican primary to Trey Gowdy, who was supported by the Tea Party.


Featured image by Andrew Burton/Getty Images

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